#FloatsForMaps

#FLOATFORMAPS

We have a slightly unusual, maybe out of left field, possibly controversial, but, we think, super interesting and exciting update for you.

We’re asking for your partnership with us in co-funding research into the groundbreaking realm of MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy for treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Throughout July, the entire floatation therapy industry is joining forces to help MAPS – the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) – reach their goal of finalizing clinical study of MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy for PTSD. Their goal is to get FDA approval for this treatment in 2021, and they’ve done an amazing job of privately raising most of the needed $25M+ budget, but we’d like to do what we can to help them cross that finish line.

At Cloud Nine Flotation, we’re huge advocates for what works. Floating works. For a myriad of different conditions and issues, and in ways that are different than any other healing modality, including helping people work through PTSD. And MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy for PTSD … it works too. Stunningly well. MAPS’ Phase 2 trial had 107 participants, all of whom had chronic, treatment-resistant PTSD. Patients in this trial had experienced, on average, 17 years of debilitating PTSD, limiting their quality of life, relationships, successes, and so much more. Upon completion of the trial, receiving only two to three sessions of MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy, 56% no longer qualified for PTSD at their 2-month follow-up. At the 12-month follow-up, 68% no longer had PTSD.

These are results that cannot be ignored, and while we’re losing 22 veterans to suicide every day, it’s a mission that should have our support.

SO, WHAT’S THE DEAL?
The short version is this: throughout July, we’re offering gift cards for float sessions and FET session for our regular price,  and for every gift card purchased, we’ll donate 15% directly to MAPS.

Click here to purchase gift cards. We’ll keep track of how many are purchased and donate 15% to MAPS.

https://cloudnine.floathelm.com/store/giftcards

Or give us a call at (360) 972-3031. Or just drop in to The Soul Space to pick some up in person.

WHAT IS MAPS?
Founded in 1986 by Rick Doblin, Ph.D., MAPS is a 501(c)(3) non-profit research and educational organization that develops medical, legal, and cultural contexts for people to benefit from the careful uses of psychedelics and cannabis. MAPS’ most recent study is using MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for the treatment of severe PTSD. To learn more, visit the MAPS website: maps.org. If you’d like to read more about the history of MAPS and their mission, you can read Acid Test in our lobby’s consciousness library. It’s a real page-turner.

WHY NOW?
MAPS had breakthrough results on their Phase 2 trials of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD, and are now conducting Phase 3 trials, the final stage of research before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) can approve a new prescription treatment. MAPS currently aims to submit its New Drug Application to the FDA in 2021 for approval. Drug development is expensive, but with our help, MAPS will be able to make this PTSD treatment widely available to the 25 million people in the world who are suffering from serious trauma. You can learn more about their trials at www.maps.org/mdma.

WHAT DOES THIS HAVE TO DO WITH FLOATING?
If you’ve floated before, you understand the powerful potential of spending time with your consciousness, devoid of stimuli, totally present to what and who you are. We believe floating to be the most powerful integration tool available to assist in the process of continued self-acceptance. One of the most compelling effects of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy is the treatment’s ability to break down mental blocks in the psyche, facilitating breakthroughs of radical self-acceptance in patients previously crippled by PTSD. We, as a float center, are wholly committed to facilitating mental, physical, and spiritual well-being–we believe in the power of honestly connecting to oneself and we see MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy as an undeniably effective tool for doing so.

There’s also some evident bridges between floatation therapy and MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy for PTSD:

* Both shut down typical fear response to thoughts/mental processes by decreasing activity in the amygdala

* Both allow for processing of traumatic memories in a safe, held, non-triggering environment

* Both seem to work, in part, by affecting the serotonergic system

* Both can provide relatively rapid access to a meditative state, and to the subconscious, that might otherwise takes years of regular psychotherapy or meditation training to attain

* Both reduce anxiety by decreasing activity in the posterior cingulate cortex

* Both induce a compassionate brain, for self and others

SO YOU’RE PROMOTING FLOATING AND DRUG USE NOW?
Nope. We maintain a strict no-intoxication policy at Oly Float, as you’ll see on our intake form. However, as we stated above, we’re passionate about what works, particularly what works when few other things do. And a near-70% elimination rate of chronic, previously treatment-resistant PTSD is simply effective, and worthy of attention. You may have recently seen high profile coverage of psychedelic-assisted therapy in the media, including Rolling Stone, The New Yorker, and recently with best-selling author Michael Pollen’s latest book, “How To Change Your Mind” (also available in our consciousness library!). Pollen’s tone on the entire topic of entheogenic medicine is intelligent, cautious and responsible. His mainstream exposition into this world is a sign of our return back to eons-old therapies that simply work. He, and MAPS, are helping us remember what we truly are, to heal, and to wake up again. We’re simply excited to be a part of that, by helping bring focus, and funding.

JOIN US, AND CHECK OUT #FLOATFORMAPS
We hope you’ll join us in supporting MAPS. Another way you can do this is to follow the #FloatForMAPS hashtag campaign on Facebook, Instagram and everywhere else and give it a Like. You can also read more about the campaign at www.FloatForMAPS.com.Or you can donate directly to MAPS instead at www.maps.org/donate.

Here’s that link to purchase gift certificates one more time:

https://cloudnine.floathelm.com/store/giftcards

Or give us a call at 520-668-4017

We hope you’re all having an awesome summer!

Kalyn and the Cloud Nine Flotation Crew

 

It’s Not Always Sensory Deprivation

Here at Cloud Nine Flotation we focus on Float Therapy which includes Sensory Deprivation, but not always. We just added two new pieces of audio excellence to the tank experience. Our first regular floatee just got out of the tank where she listened to an hour of The Dalai Lama’s Greatest Hit! No kidding, it’s a recording of the Dalai Lama chanting for 48 minutes, then a bit of silence followed by a temple gong to bring you to awareness that the time is up. She said it was like being INSIDE the temple! She’s been floating for several months every other week and came out visually glowing. The 2nd piece is Humpback Whalesong. This piece is on in the tank for the first 10 minutes and the last 5 minutes of a 60 min float. I can’t wait to experience it myself.

As time goes one, we will add more audio experiences to our library, and of course we’ll keep you informed.

Fear, Anxiety and Floatier Things Part 2

Fear, Anxiety & Floatier Things: Part 2

One response we hear over and over from people when we talk to them about floating is, “Oh no … I’m claustrophobic.”

But … only 5% of the population is actually claustrophobic, according to Wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claustrophobia

Claustrophobia is defined as: “the fear of being enclosed in a small space or room and unable to escape.[1] It can be triggered by many situations or stimuli, including elevators crowded to capacity, windowless rooms, small cars and even tight-necked clothing. It is typically classified as an anxiety disorder, which often results in panic attacks. ”

We hear from much higher than 5% of the new people we talk to about floating that “claustrophobia” is the reason they won’t try it. But those people aren’t, actually, claustrophic, which is very much a clinical condition.

So … what’s really going on here?

The more honest or accurate response might be:

“I’m afraid of being alone.”

“I’m afraid of being in the dark.”

“I’m afraid of not being in control.”

“I’m afraid of being left with my thoughts.”

“I don’t know how to meditate.”

“I’m afraid of being left in there.”

These are all much more accurate, and very valid concerns. So, allow us to clear a few things up:

= You don’t have to be in the dark. =
Float with the lights on! That’s totally okay. One of our tanks has a light in it specifically for this reason. You’ll still get a ton of benefit, even with the lights on. In fact, in studies of physiological stress markers during a float, being in the dark was the least important aspect of the experience. It’s more important for the meditative/mental aspects of the experience, but not needed for plain ole’ stress management and relaxation.

= You’re in control =
There’s no locks on the doors. You can get out whenever you want to. You can choose to have lights on, music going, be still the whole time or play around and stretch the whole time. It’s totally up to you. You’re in full control the whole time.

= You don’t have to be alone with just your thoughts =
This is a common concern. In fact, studies have shown that some people literally prefer electric shocks to being alone with their thoughts. (https://www.theatlantic.com/…/people-prefer-electri…/373936/) This isn’t surprising. Our culture in particular has become highly used to distraction and stimulation, constant entertainment, constant aversion away from just being with our thoughts. It seems that boredom is a thing of the past in our culture, a lost gift of time for reflection. Here’s the good news: you don’t have to be alone with your thoughts. There’s a lot of benefit if you are, but you don’t have to be. You can have music playing the entire float, if you want to. Again, still a ton of benefits to be had otherwise. Just being in a microgravity environment, with no stimulation on your skin, no proprioceptive input, no vestibular input, all while absorbing large amounts of magnesium … those all have phenomenal benefit for your nervous system, body and mind.

= You don’t have to know a darned thing about meditation =
Literally, nothing. Doesn’t matter if you’ve never meditated a minute of your life. You don’t need to go spend 6 months on a mountaintop in Nepal to learn how. Just float. The meditation just happens as a natural byproduct. It actually feels like kind of a massive cheat. Many of us spent years and years learning how to meditate while sitting uncomfortably in some painful position in our heavy meat suits. Floating just bypasses all of that and takes you directly to the good stuff. It’s like training wheels for new meditators, and a rocketpack for experienced meditators.

= We leave no floater behind =
In 3 years of running Cloud Nine Flotation, nobody – NOBODY – has ever been left behind in a float.

So, it comes down to: “I’m afraid of being alone.”

Yeah. That’s the tough one, isn’t it?

Of all the humans in the world who’s company we could enjoy, why is our own often the most intimidating? Is it because we are our own worst critics? Our own harshest judges? Or is it just plain old boredom? What is boredom but a craving for distraction? It comes back to the same questions: why are we so eager to be distracted away from our own company? What is lurking in there, what is so difficult in that inner landscape, that we feel we have to run away from it? Do we *really* think we can just keep running away from our selves, and that that’s a race we can EVER win? Really? When will we stop running a losing race? When we die?

Maybe it’s time to stop running. To look deeply at these questions. To learn how to accept our selves instead of judging or critiquing our selves. To just BE with our selves, see what wants to come up and be resolved, be accepted, be loved, so we don’t have to spend the rest of our lives running, and exhausting ourselves, in an unwinnable marathon.

When someone says, “Oh no … I’m claustrophobic”, nine times out of ten, this is what they’re really saying: “Oh no … I prefer to keep running my unwinnable marathon, and will keep running it until I die.”

Are you ready to stop running from your self?

There’s really NO better place to see what’s going on on the inside, and figure out how to move beyond it in healthier new directions, than in a float. (Which, by the way, in our case, are 8 feet long, 5 feet wide, 3 feet above you, and, again, come with the option of lights and music. Don’t want to deprive your primary senses? That’s cool. Just FLOAT.)

—–

If you have a friend who won’t try floating because they say they’re claustrophobic, consider tagging them in this post. Not in a jabbing or mocking way. But with love, and with the intention to help them work through that and discover something that could be really good for them and which they might really enjoy.

The fear is real. The label, in the vast majority of cases, isn’t. It’s important to focus on what the real fear is, though. Because we can’t conquer fears that we don’t properly understand the origin of.

New Hours, & New Names

Things at Cloud Nine Flotation are dynamic! That means when inspiration hits, we act! In honor of national coming out day, I’m officially coming out as a Sci-Fi Nerd. To many this is no surprise, but I’ve been secretly calling my float tank a Tardis for years and now it’s official. Room #1 (which is bathed in a blue light) is now the Tardis Room and Room #2 (which is the tank with an LED light in it, and bathed in a purple light) is now the Stargate Room. What better names to depict a float tank than time portals right?

Also, we are expanding our Sunday hours to include the mornings. You can now float on Sunday Mornings at 9, 11, 1 and 3pm in the Tardis Room and 9:30, 11:30, 1:30 and 3:30 in the Stargate Room.

Fear, Anxiety & Floatier Things

October is typically a month of focus on scary things in our culture. Things that go bump in the night. Things that trigger our fears. Fears of mysterious threats in the dark, in particular.

So that’s what we’re focusing on too throughout the month of October. Fear, anxiety and things that go bump in the float.

Here’s a reality we don’t talk about very much: the majority of people are afraid of float tanks. And by “majority”, we’re guesstimating 50%+. So … most.

What is it that scares some people about floating? About floating in a saltwater solution in the dark?

Stranger Things Tucson

Certainly, we have some good evolutionary reasons for being wary of the dark. Thousands of years of being picked off by predatory creatures that emerge from the shadows will do that to our mammalian brains.

And fear of the deep is also well-programmed into our brains. Even though the solution in a float tank is only 11 inches deep, when you’re floating in the dark on 1,000 pounds of Epsom salts, we lose that sense altogether. At that point, we may as well be floating on the surface of an entire ocean. At night. And what’s in that ocean? What lurks beneath, waiting to devour us from below? Our brains have spent a long time becoming wired in preparation for that threat. Our skin even prunes to enable greater traction on rocky surfaces that will help us rapidly escape the water in the event of attack from below (according to one theory of pruning, at least).

But there’s a more emotional component to it than that. We conquered the power of flame and enjoyed warding off the creatures of the night with roaring fires for thousands of years too. And we generally stay out of the water now, having conquered it with boats. So we can only blame wolves in the shadows and monsters from the deep for so long.

Why is it that floating in the dark, alone with nothing but our thoughts, is more terrifying for many people than even the scariest horror movie? One study, conducted by Science Magazine, found that a lot of people would literally rather experience electric shock than be left alone with nothing to do.

Anybody who floats regularly will quickly tell you that floating is simply one of the most relaxing and happiness-inducing experiences imaginable. And yet this fear of floating among people who have not yet tried it persists.

It doesn’t help, of course, that pretty much every single reference to floating in major media portrays floating in a sinister light. The original offender, Altered States, in 1980 convinced us that float tanks would make us lose our minds, experience LSD-style hallucinations, and eventually turn into a primordial ooze. Minority Report suggested that the only applicable use for float tanks was for enslaved psychics to remote-view grisly murders. The Simpsons continued the conflation between floating and psychedelia with a trippy experience that Homer goes on in a float tank. Joe Rogan would later double down on that false association with constant discussion of powerful psychedelic experiences and floating in the same breath (we can’t tell you how many Rogan fans we’ve had to disappoint and re-educate on the comparatively much less psychologically interesting benefits that floatation therapy offers). When floating appeared on Fringe, it was couched as “ripping open consciousness”, with the main character being warned that she “might not come back” as the creaky metal hatch is closed on her. Later, Stranger Things would famously show a float tank – or at least a kiddie pool full of cold salt water – invoking inter-dimensonal travel and experiences of “Demogorgons”.

None of that is at all true, of course. People have beautiful, transcendent experiences. And certainly some difficult emotional stuff can arise to be dealt with (this is what makes it such an effective tool for managing PTSD). Rarely, though, is there a Demogorgon.

Between evolutionary fear of the dark, a psychoemotional resistance to being alone with our thoughts, and a constant barrage of wildly inaccurate and melodramatic media representations of sensory deprivation, it’s really no mystery why so many people feel so intimidated by it.

Throughout October, we’ll be breaking down some of those fears, explaining how floating is safe and fun, examining the mental nature of fear, and sharing how everyday people have used floating to conquer their own fears and anxieties.

So follow along with us for a month of Fear, Anxiety and Floatier Things as you enjoy your Halloween season.

Folllow us on Facebook. Click here!

October Specials are Very Special Indeed!

For the entire month of October, Cloud Nine Flotation is offering a special for people who have never floated here before! $42 for a single 60 min float or $135 for 3 – 60 min floats! Go to www.FloatTucson.com and click on Monthly Specials to take advantage of the offer and book your appointment. This special expires in 3 months, so book your appointment soon. Coming in November, something VERY special.

Cloud Nine Flotation Enters it’s Second Year!!

October 1, 2016 marks the 2nd year Cloud Nine Flotation has been in business. It normally takes about 18 months to see real progress on a big project. After planting seeds every day, watering them. Making sure they get sun, you need to move on to the next set of seeds. It’s called inspired action. So I’m a thrilled beyond belief with the progress of Cloud Nine Flotation. In twelve short months I’ve met or exceeded my dreams. In October I’m very excited to also announce that we have been published in TWO local Tucson Magazines. The first is Natural Awakenings. You’ll find the article here: Natural Awakenings. The 2nd is Tucson Lifestyles Magazine, page 80 if you have the hard copy of the magazine. I’ll post the electronic version hopefully on Monday.

Life is a wonderful adventure. I never thought that after 27 years I’d be back in the business of Flotation Therapy. You never know where life will take you. Be open to all possibilities. It’s glorious.